Tracy's blog

I’m Tracy Au and I have graduated from the Professional Writing program from university. I am an aspiring screenwriter, so this blog is used to promote my writing and attract people who will hire me to write for your TV show or movie. I write a lot about writing, TV, movies, jokes, and my daily life and opinions. I have another blog promoting my TV project at www.thevertexfighter.blogspot.com.

Sunday, November 22, 2015

"PowerPoint personalities"

Sept. 27 "PowerPoint personalities": I cut out this article called "PowerPoint personalities: Meet the four faces of a fantastic workforce" by Shannon Mandel (Talent Egg) in the Metro on Nov. 20, 2013.  Read on to see which personality you are and what industry you should go into:

Identifying your personality type can help you focus your career down a path best-suited to you.

In a competitive job market, it’s important to show employers that you have what it takes to become a valued member of their team.

Employers look beyond hard skills and experience – they also want to know if your personality type will suit their needs, and will sometimes even conduct personality tests during the hiring process.

So, how can you identify your personality type?

Software Advice CEO, Don Fornes, along with psychiatrist Dr. James Maynard and researcher Holly Regan, found that top-performing employees can be categorized into one of four desirable personality types: The Giver, the Champ, the Matrix Thinker and the Savant.
 

1) The Giver

This employee puts the needs of others before their own.

They work hard and frequently go ‘above and beyond’ what is expected of them. Their pleasant nature and eagerness to please is often appreciated, but they can be prone to burnout because of their tendency to take on extra work and put others first.

Givers are team-players, non-confrontational and conflict-averse. When Givers are stressed, they tend to suffer silently because they don’t want to ‘rock the boat.’ They may possess good leadership skills, but usually would rather be in a support role.

Givers can improve their job performance by establishing a clear understanding of work priorities and expectations with team members and managers.
 
 

2) The Champ

An enthusiastic people-person – many successful salespeople and politicians are Champs.
Champs are driven, confident, motivated and skilled at reading people’s emotions. Champs prefer to be independent and strive toward personal success.

They sometimes have difficulty working towards a team or group objective. While Champs believe in themselves and the companies they work for, they can develop an inflated ego and they often have a ‘chip on their shoulder’ from past hardships. This can lead Champs to be stubborn and belligerent with management and fellow employees.

Where possible, an office Champ should learn more about other coworker’s responsibilities through teamwork or job shadowing. This will help them develop a sense of perspective.
 
 

3) The Matrix Thinker

This is a creative employee who often thinks ‘outside the box.’

A Matrix Thinker is a clever problem-solver and an innovative connector of ideas. The Matrix Thinker can be a revolutionary, but can also be disorganized, impulsive and easily distracted. They may have difficulty completing projects on time because of their tendency to constantly jump from idea to idea.

This personality type often has difficulty relating to co-workers. They prefer to work alone so that they can have control over their projects and have difficulty handling criticism.

Matrix Thinkers should push for the time and resources they need to do the innovative work that makes them so valuable – and then deliver results.

Which roles match your personality?


4) The Savant

A team member who is really, really good at what they do.

They have incredible focus and are determined to become experts in their field. Savants are most successful when working in a field that involves intensive knowledge of a specific topic.

They are often skilled writers, researchers and engineers. Savants are perfectionists, and may have trouble dealing with opposition to their expert opinion. They are often introverted and suffer social anxiety.

A workplace Savant should try and integrate with their team. Participating in team projects and activities will help them build rapport and exercise their social skills.

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