Tracy's blog

I’m Tracy Au and I have graduated from the Professional Writing program from university. I am an aspiring screenwriter, so this blog is used to promote my writing and attract people who will hire me to write for your TV show or movie. I write a lot about writing, TV, movies, jokes, and my daily life and opinions. I have another blog promoting my TV project at www.thevertexfighter.blogspot.com.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

"Dealing with a lazy coworker"/ "Mom, dad, meet my new career"

Feb. 15, 2016 "Dealing with a lazy coworker": I cut out this article by Catherine Ahern in 24 News on Aug. 20, 2012.

The tips are:

Assess the damage to you- Does this person who doesn't work hard have an effect on your work?  If you have to correct this person's mistakes often, then it does.  If he or she doesn't work as hard as you do, but still gets work done, then it shouldn't be a problem.

Talk to your co-worker privately- and tell him like: "You didn't give me the report on time, so I was late by 2 days."

Establish your expectations- tell him about the clear deadlines, and if you can't meet them, get him to tell you that.

Explain what will happen if the person doesn't meet those expectations- for example like: "If you don't give me the data in time, I will submit the report without it and tell the boss that I didn't receive your data."

Let your boss know about it.  Also give it some time because it's hard for people to change.

"Maximize an internship": I cut out this article by Julie Tyios in 24 News on Sept. 19, 2011:

"Map out your goals and the skills you want to work on while you're there, as well as the contacts you want to make."

"Will this internship help you get where you want to go in your career?"


"Tips from 'Queen of the Random Job'": I cut out this article by Linda White in 24 News on Jul. 23, 2012.  It profiles Bethany Mooradian who has a degree in puppetry and had random jobs like Ronald McDonald's bodyguard and cleaning Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen's estates.

There is an article on it on the internet.

Identify your skills:

Compile a list of your skills to use as your own resource when looking for work.

"Go where the fishing is good.  Don't just put a worm on your hook and throw it in the river and hope someone will come and get it.  You want to see what other people are looking for and then provide it to them."

Create a Facebook fan page for your field of interest, get on Twitter to talk with others, and blog.

Organization, efficiency skills sought: There are a lot of work- at- home jobs that are scams.

My opinion: Some Mystery Shoppers jobs aren't all scams.  I have friend D who does mystery shopping here and there.

"Does it make sense that I would get paid $25/hr to stuff envelopes at home?  Probably not.  Unfortunately, scammers are huge with random jobs and they do everything they can to take advantage of people. 

Future of random jobs: "We're going to a trade economy...when people had specific skills and would sell those skills make money like a butcher and the baker."

My opinion: She's right.  We have websites like Fiverr where people do small tasks like write a blog post for $5.

She has a book called I Got Scammed So You Don't Have To:

-Virtual assistants
 -merchandising
-mystery shopper
-use your talent like be an extra when a film is being filmed in your city.

Or be a "standardized patient" acting out diseases to help medical students with their board exams.

My opinion: I like jobs with a structure.  I go to my restaurant job, I serve customers and clean.

Bethany had a degree in puppetry.  I know about clown college, but not too much about puppetry.

"Mom, dad, meet my new career": I cut out this article by Shannon Mandel (Talent Egg) in Metro on Feb. 19, 2014:

"It's often challenging to find someone you'll be happy with, much like it's challenging to find a satisfying job."

Here are 5 tips to find a job and a partner:

Turn to your friends and family:

They may know someone who would jive with your sense of humor or have insight into a job that would highlight your skills.  Tell them and your social network that you're looking.

Know the difference between love and lust:

Lust is looking at date's picture and falling for the picture without looking at the profile.

Lust is looking at a job posting with a fancy title and not the job description.

Do you share any common interests with your date?

Are you excited about a company's culture and values?

Dig deep to find out if you're compatible.

Perfection isn't all it's cracked up to be:

Deal breakers or factors that they simply can not be happy with.  You shouldn't settle, but if you're too picky, you might end up passing up great opportunities.

Make a list of deal breakers and why they are on the list.  It's highly individual, but show it to a trusted friend.

Discussing and reflecting might lead you to realize that some things are not as important to you as you initially thought.

Don't put all your eggs in one basket; diversify your search: 

You're not going to find your soulmate at the same bar week after week.  Go to places like: a friend, at an event, dating website, social media.

You can get a job through friends, networking events, career websites like Talentegg.ca.

Be broad and specific.  Go on mainstream dating sites and sites for groups that you are part of.

Look for jobs on general job search sites and for those in your desired career.

Let love grow:

Are you not sure if this is the "one" for you?

Like can grow to love.

Communicate to your partner or employer: express what you need from them to feel more fulfilled.  Do you need more support?  More challenges?  They just might listen to you and work with your needs.  Now that's a sure sign of a relationship worth saving.

Finding a job you love and a partner, involves effort and planning.  Enlist your friends, dig deep to discover true compatibility, be flexible, leave no stone unturned and put in an effort to turn "like" into "love."

"Making dreams become a reality": I cut out this article by Joanne Richard in 24 News on Nov. 26, 2012.  The Dreams Job Survey said 33% of professionals are working their childhood dream job.

43% of respondents without their dream job said: "As I got older, I became interested in a different career path."

More than 70% said that the most important characteristic of a dream job is 'taking pleasure in your work.'

8% helping others.

How to land your dream job:

-Talk to a career expert to connect your passion with employment

-follow your dream employers on LinkedIn. You can learn about the people in the company

-Once you know your dream job, look at the education and skills you need.  How do you plan to add new skill sets?

-Network- go to LinkedIn where there are people with your dream job.  There are insights on how to get there.


1 Comments:

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