Tracy's blog

I’m Tracy Au and I have graduated from the Professional Writing program from university. I am an aspiring screenwriter, so this blog is used to promote my writing and attract people who will hire me to write for your TV show or movie. I write a lot about writing, TV, movies, jokes, and my daily life and opinions. I have another blog promoting my TV project at www.thevertexfighter.blogspot.com.

Sunday, December 11, 2016

"How honest are you at work?"/ "What makes winners weep?"

Jul. 21, 2015 "How honest are you at work?": I cut out this article by Carole Kanchier in 24 News on Feb. 25, 2013.  There's a picture of a man with a long nose like Pinocchio in the 24 News.  As for the link I put up, it has the word "truth."  There is a magnifying class and it has the word "lie" in it. 

Check your Lie Quotient

 Answer “yes” or “no:”

1. I’ve lied on my resume or fudged reports.
2. I'll fib to avoid arguments.
3. I fail to disclose pertinent information.
4. I’ve cheated on school or employment tests.
5. I’d tell a face-saving lie to protect my career.
6. I exaggerate the truth or tell white lies to avoid hurting someone.
7. I lie to better serve clients or employer.
8. I’ve stolen office supplies or padded expense accounts.
9, I’ve copied software or used the Internet on company time.
10. I call in sick when I’m not.

Scoring: One point for each “yes.” 7 or higher suggests you could enhance honesty.

Lying is stressful, and stress harms health and accelerates aging. Frequent lying and fear of exposure keeps your body's "fight or flight" response on. Long term activation of this system may result in health conditions like heart disease.

The Pinocchio Effect also kicks in when you lie. The temperature in the muscles around the nose becomes hotter, according to Emilio Milán and Elvira López at the University of Granada. There is corresponding action in the insular cortex of the brain which controls emotions. Fear of being caught in a lie increases activity in the insular cortex, leading to more heat emanating from the nose. The researchers call this the Pinocchio effect. In Walt Disney’s Pinocchio, the boy puppet’s lies are revealed whenever his wooden nose grows.

Lying damages a person's self respect and credibility. Dishonesty also affects company productivity. Using company time and stealing small items add up. Honest employees pay for others' lack of integrity through stricter rules.

Why people lie

We learn to lie. Many children don't view cheating on exams as theft because some schools fail to show disapproval of students' cheating. The same message is given when parents cheat on taxes. Children learn all methods for achieving goals are justified.

As adults, we fib because we need to appear competent, want to avoid hurt or conflict, desire to protect our jobs, or not rock the boat. Some workers may lie about a sick child to protect themselves from taking another business trip.

Political and business leaders have lied for centuries. Recent studies conducted by Paul Piff, social psychologist, at the University of California, Berkeley, found that self-interests tend to spur the elite to lie and cheat.

"Honesty is the best policy. If I lose mine honor, I lose myself." William Shakespeare

Speak cautiously. Exaggerating your ability to meet expectations will hurt your status and your business more than being honest up front. Truth and trust go together.

- Communicate accurately, openly and transparently. Be explicit, direct and clear about your motives. State what you need or expect.

- Shift mindset. Lying is a learned survival strategy that can be unlearned. Note what triggers your decision to lie. "What fear (e.g., being wrong, hurting someone) is behind this choice?"

"Why do you believe the lie will have a better outcome, and for whom?" Reflect on your answers to uncover your motivation.

When you sense yourself crafting a lie, ask yourself, “What’s the worst that can happen if I tell the truth?”

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life (www.questersdaretochange) provides additional strategies for enhancing honesty.


Aug. 3, 2015 "What makes winners weep?": I cut out this article in the Metro on Apr. 23, 2014.  It was in the business section.  It's psychology.  Here's the whole article:

When golfer Bubba Watson won his first major tournament -- the 2012 Masters -- the shaggy-haired Floridian dropped his head on his caddy's shoulder and sobbed. On Sunday when Watson claimed his second green jacket at Augusta National, his caddy's shoulder was again subjected to a drenching.

Tiger Woods, one of the fiercest competitors in sports, wept profusely after winning the 2006 British Open. Fellow golfer Fred Couples hid his face behind his visor when he lost complete control in a TV interview after winning the 2003 Shell Houston Open.

What's this about? Why do people cry tears of joy?

It's not just golfers, by the way, and it's not just athletes. Weddings, graduations, even sometimes sex -- there are a variety of joyous occasions that perplexingly turn on the tears, a physiological response predominantly associated with pain, sorrow and loss.

Ad Vingerhoets has been studying crying for years, one of few academics in the field.
"It's a lonely business," admits Vingerhoets, a professor of clinical psychology at Tilburg University in the Netherlands.

He says the way humans cry and the triggers that turn on the waterworks differ greatly depending on the stage of life a person is in.

For helpless infants, crying is a way to communicate distress to parents. It is necessarily loud, a characteristic that changes over time. The older one gets, the less noise one makes while crying.

Vingerhoets says regardless of age, humans cry in response to powerlessness and to loss or separation. But where children and adolescents will cry in response to pain, tears as a reaction to physical pain are less commonly seen with advancing age.

Instead, adults cry about things that move them, evoke their empathy or sympathy, appeal to their sense of morality or sentimentality.

Children don't cry when they hear about someone losing their life to try to save someone else, but an adult might. Similarly, a beautiful piece of music might bring tears to adult eyes but would be unlikely to do so to a child's.

At the heart of that type of reaction may be a type of powerlessness, Vingerhoets suggests. People who are overwhelmed with emotion -- even positive emotions -- can have trouble processing the flood of feelings. Tears provide a release.

"You don't know how to express your emotions and you're really overwhelmed," he explains.
He suggests that the athletes who cry after winning are often dealing with complex emotions. For instance, they may have affected a career comeback after overcoming adversity.

He points to a Dutch cyclist, Leontien van Moorsel, who cried after she won a gold medal at the Summer Olympics in Athens in 2004. She had been a successful competitor but developed severe anorexia. Her win in Athens came after she battled back from the eating disorder.

Some find their victories tinged with other complicating emotions. Couples won the 1992 Masters and several PGA events in the 1990s, but had gone several years without a victory. He admitted he had been afraid he'd never win again.

And Woods' uncharacteristic collapse into tears came at the first major tournament he won following the death of his father, Earl. He said later his emotional response stemmed from the sadness he felt that his father, a dominant force in his golfing career, wasn't there to see him win.

Watson, who famously said he never dreamed he could win an event like the Masters, claimed his first just two weeks after he and his wife adopted their son, Caleb. Angie Watson and the baby were not with him at Augusta for his first victory; on Sunday Watson quickly scooped Caleb, now a toddler, into his arms after winning, carrying him to the clubhouse where he recorded his winning score.

"Those people cry when they win who have had problems before," says Vingerhoets. "They had difficulties to qualify themselves for the Olympic Games. They were severely hurt or wounded and it was doubtful (they could compete again)."

By contrast, one rarely sees tears in the victors who expect to win. "The usual winners, I think it's far less likely that they cry."

Social bonding can also lead to tears in adults, Vingerhoets says -- things like hearing one's anthem played at the Olympics.

Canadian freestyle skier Justine Dufour-Lapointe was the picture of exuberance after winning gold at the Sochi Olympics. But after she received her medal and watched the Maple Leaf rise to the strains of O Canada, tears rolled down her cheeks.




May 16, 2016 "The Girl's Guide to Getting a Job": I was reading my sister's old Marie Claire Jan. 2009 magazine that she gave me.  This may be old, but I find that it's still relevant:

5 industries that are still hiring:

Engineering
Bachelor's or Master's degree in it.
$70K-$90K

Health care
Bachelor's or master's in nursing, physical therapy
$45K-$75K

Information technology
$65K-$110K
Bachelor's in computer science and information systems

Government
$30K-$100K
Bachelor's degree

Education
$60K
Bachelor's, masters in education

My week:

Dec. 5, 2016 Job interview: Last month I did a job interview.  What I didn't know, was that it was through a staffing agency.  The interview was good and all, but I didn't get a call back.  It was good pay of $15/hr.

Dec. 6, 2016 Eco Global Corporation: I found this job for a lead generation specialist that needs a business degree.  I looked up the company and there was an article about them.  Don't make rush decisions when buying things door-to-door, especially with big items like a furnace.  If it's buying chocolate and donuts, and newspaper subscriptions, then you may buy it if you want to.



Dental receptionist: I got an email last week for a job interview.  It was on that day in the early morning.  The email was sent to me last night.  I then had to look up on the internet and call them.  The receptionist A says the boss will be there only in the morning, and I can drop off my resume in the afternoon.

I went to work, and after work I called the receptionist again to ask if I should still come and drop off my resume.  By all means, she could say to me that they already hired someone and there is no need for my resume.  She told me to come anyway, because then it will show that I'm serious about the job.  So I did.

Also every morning, I always check my work email to see if I have any replies on my job search.

"Is Global Tesol a scam?": I emailed you guys and posted it on my blog last week and asked this question.  Jessica was the only one who answered and said it's competitive to teach English overseas.  I hope I'm not annoying you guys with asking "Is this job a scam?"  I want to make sure.

I showed it my dad and he says:

1. No guarantee you will get a job overseas.

2. The course is a 5 day class training and it could be like $300-$500.

3. You will get a certificate.  What happens after that? 

Where do you look for a job?  Who will hire you?

It's not a scam, but you won't get hired.  There are lots of applicants and schools will hire people with a degree.  It's like they're selling you the hope.

Examples: This reminds me of a few people.

1. R- she is this jr. high teacher with an education degree.  She told me she taught English in Germany.  She speaks German.  She kind of barely got in, because the school over there was desperate.

2. Globe and Mail life essay.  There was an article I cut out and it was a white guy who went to Japan to teach.

3. 20/20.  There was a episode about a white woman who went to teach in Africa.  There was something about her finding out one of the teachers were sexually assaulting the female students there.  She found out and was discreet and tried to find a way to stop him.  Later she was murdered.  I think they caught the killer.  I saw this ep and it could be from 2011-2014.



God's Love We Deliver: I was reading a book review about a Joan River's book and it said she donated to this charity:


God's Love We Deliver is the New York City metropolitan area's leading provider of nutritious, individually-tailored meals to people who are too sick to shop or cook for themselves. 

Founded in 1985 when one woman began delivering food on her bicycle to a man dying from AIDS, God's Love now cooks 6,200 meals each weekday, delivering them to clients living with life-altering illnesses in all five boroughs of New York City, Westchester and Nassau Counties, and Hudson County, New Jersey. All of our services are provided free of charge to our clients, their children and to the senior caregivers of our senior clients, without regard to income, and we have never maintained a waiting list. Because we believe the combination of hunger and serious illness is a crisis, we deliver food within 24 – 48 hours of first being contacted.   

God's Love We Deliver is a non-sectarian organization, providing meals with the strong belief of "food as medicine."  To that end, we employ a team of registered dietitians who individually tailor meals to each client's specific medical requirements. God's Love provides all services by employing a small but dedicated professional staff and with the critical assistance of 10,000 volunteers annually.



Medical clinic open: Here's some good news.  The medical clinic that I go to was to close down, but it's staying open now.

Matthew McCounaghy: I'm not a fan of his, but I thought this was some good news:


Matthew McConaughey gave some unsuspecting students at his alma mater a ride home they won't soon forget.
The 47-year-old Oscar-winning actor got behind the wheel of a golf cart on Monday night to help out University of Texas students.
McConaughey volunteered with a student-government program called SURE Walk that shared a photo on Facebook of him with smiling students.

Do a survey to read content: I was going to copy and paste some articles into my email drafts and then I saw that I had to answer 3 questions before I can read the article.  I get paying to be a news subscriber to get access to it, but not with a survey.

Dec. 9, 2016: Today I was on YouTube and they have a survey question before you can watch something.

CSR job interview: I was at another interview earlier this week.  I learned from that dental receptionist job interview is to always check my business email first thing in the morning if there is an interview that day.  I called my boss at my second job if I can come in later to work.  She says I can.  I go to the interview.

It was an average interview.  The interviewer was an Asian guy.  He seems nice and friendly.  It is about being a fundraiser.  There is no door-to-door or standing on the street.  Big charities like Unicef and Amnesty International pay the company like $1, and the fundraisers raise $4-6 for the charities.

Pros:

1. It is good company with a good cause.
2. Full-time and permanent.
3. Good hours.

Cons:

1. I am kind of eh with the job.  I have done interviews like this before like Telus through Latta Corp.  I am unsure if this job is a good fit for me.  This is the first interview, and I may be invited to get a 2nd interview.  I would go to the 2nd interview to get more information.  I asked how much the pay was, and he told me he would tell me at 2nd interview.

TV shows:

Secrets and Lies: I finished watching the 2nd season of this show.  Who would kill Kate and why?  I thought I was going to record the whole season and watch it in one week, but I watched it every week.  It's very good.  There are new twists each episode.  I can't predict it.  This season is as good as the last one.  Each season has 10 eps.  If you like murder mystery, then watch it.  At least watch the pilot to see if you like it.




Arrow: Today I saw the fall finale.  I was surprised by the plot twist at the end.

South Park: I've been watching this with my brother.  This season was based on the election, but the teacher Mr. Garrison was Donald Trump.  Mr. Garrison had the same hair and bad spray tan.
 

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